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How Does Delayed Retirement Affect Mortality and Health?

Older Americans have been retiring later for a number of reasons, including jobs that are becoming less physically demanding, the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution pensions, and changes in Social Security’s incentives. What are the implications of working longer for workers’ mortality and health? Answering this question is complicated, because work and health are jointly determined – healthy people with lower mortality tend to work longer. Previous studies looking at the causal effect of work on mortality and health have found mixed results and have tended to focus on the effects of early retirement, not delayed retirement. A simple assumption would be that the relationship between them is symmetric. But it is unclear that that assumption is correct – after all, people who decide to keep working are likely a healthier group than those who stop early. This paper uses administrative data from the Netherlands and exploits policy variation designed to delay retirement to explore the links between work and health outcomes.

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Public Sector HealthCare Roundtable Weekly e-News (01/30/2019)

Topics:
Senate Finance and House Oversight Committees to Hold Drug Pricing Hearings.
House Lawmakers Push New Bill to Repeal Cadillac Tax.
Federal Judge to Consider Effects of AHPs in Case Against Department of Labor.
Democratic Presidential Candidates Give Drug Pricing Policies New Momentum.

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Can California and NYC Afford Their Near-Universal Health-Care Plans?

Gov. Gavin Newsom and Mayor Bill de Blasio initiated ambitious plans this week to cover drastically more residents, including undocumented immigrants who are not currently eligible for subsidized insurance.

Can a city or a state afford near-universal health care? New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and California’s newly sworn-in governor, Gavin Newsom, think so.

Earlier this week, both Democratic leaders initiated ambitious plans that would move their jurisdictions toward universal coverage, an idea that has gained traction in progressive circles thanks to support from leaders on Capitol Hill, including Sen. Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

The popular progressive platform permeated state and local politics in the midterm elections. Washington state came close to putting the matter before voters as a ballot initiative; it failed to get enough signatures to qualify. Newsom, meanwhile, campaigned on single-payer, a form of universal health care that has yet to be successfully implemented in any state because of cost concerns.

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